Gaggan

Gaggan
Gaggan

The moment the server sets down a chilled porcelain spoon with the gelatinous white bubble, it is clear this is going to be no ordinary culinary adventure. In the mouth, the amuse bouche explodes in a sensual blend of creamy yoghurt, cumin, rock salt and pepper. It’s an adaptation of papri chaat, a popular Indian street snack. And this delightful mouthful has had diners in his thrall ever since Chef Gaggan Anand opened doors to his restaurant, a whitewashed colonial-style wooden house in Lang Suan.

Inside, the two storeys offer a cosy atmosphere with floor-to-ceiling French doors, wooden floors, white furniture and chic marble tabletops that is at once relaxed and elegant. for most diners though the best seats in the house is at the Chef’s Table, where with the flick of a switch, a translucent window clears to show off the kitchen-laboratory replete with space-age equipment, Pacojets, liquid nitrogen on tap, vacuum-packed meats slowly cooking in water baths, shiny racks that hold large syringes and jar upon jar of ingredients ranging from colourful edible flowers and freeze-dried fruits to salts sourced from around the globe. The first Indian and only the second Asian to intern under the Michelin-starred Ferran Adria, this is where Gaggan using science and technology to create modernist re-interpretations of traditional Indian recipes.

Gaggan

Opt for his ‘blind’ tasting menu that is an epicurean journey inspired by the flavours of India. It changes constantly and each course is plated with an artist’s eye and serves only to pique your interest about the next.

Sometimes it is crispy soft-shell crab with a tamarind and molasses dressing that offers sweet-sour combo assertively accentuated by black peppercorns. Another time it is a red chicken tikka kebab wreathed in a delicate lemony foam topped by blue angel flowers that taste of fresh oysters and with a side of salty fingers, a plant that grows along the coasts of tropical America and Asia and has a crunchy texture and salty, slight bitter taste that pairs well with the succulent meat. Or, there is Iberian pork neck cooked in a Goan vindaloo reduction, Prawn Curry Kerala style, and Mutton Bhuna served with triangles of piping hot naan bread. In between he sends out his version of mojitos: sticks of cane that are infused with rum, limejuice and mint are stuck in colourful little aluminium buckets packed with crushed ice.



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